Climate Change's Worst-Case Scenario Is 200 Feet of Sea Level Rise

by Daniel Bailey
(Michigan, United States)

200 Feet of Sea Level Rise

200 Feet of Sea Level Rise

Climate Change’s Worst-Case Scenario: 200 Feet of Sea Level Rise

With cumulative fossil fuel emissions of 10,000 gigatonnes of carbon (GtC), Antarctica is projected to become almost ice-free with an average contribution to sea-level rise exceeding 3 m per century during the [next] millennium. Consistent with recent observations and simulations, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet becomes unstable with 600 to 800 GtC of additional carbon emissions. Beyond this additional carbon release, the destabilization of ice basins in both West and East Antarctica results in a threshold increase in global sea level. Unabated carbon emissions thus threaten the Antarctic Ice Sheet in its entirety with associated sea-level rise that far exceeds that of all other possible sources.




Winkelmann et al 2015 - Combustion of available fossil fuel resources sufficient to eliminate the Antarctic Ice Sheet

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